Library Ink Stamps: Brought to you by the Exile Bibliophile
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from bookporn  257 notes
hispine:

Today was my last day at the library where I’ve been taking these pictures. I have hundreds more, so I’ll keep posting, but I don’t work there any more. I’m moving on to a different job—a big, adult job with high heels and “the fiscal year 2014” and a printer/copier that everyone is mad at.

It’s a good thing, really, but I will say this: disappearing into the shelves was the closest thing I had to church. Taking pictures was the closest thing I had to testifying.
I will really, really miss it.

hispine:

Today was my last day at the library where I’ve been taking these pictures. I have hundreds more, so I’ll keep posting, but I don’t work there any more. I’m moving on to a different job—a big, adult job with high heels and “the fiscal year 2014” and a printer/copier that everyone is mad at.

It’s a good thing, really, but I will say this: disappearing into the shelves was the closest thing I had to church. Taking pictures was the closest thing I had to testifying.

I will really, really miss it.

Reblogged from uicspecialcollections  413 notes

uicspecialcollections:

nypl:

This 1928 NYPL overdue book slip was miraculously discovered in the 1980s during the construction of the Tenement Museum. The Museum kept the card on display, stating that the title of the book on the card is “one of the great mysteries, we unfortunately do not know.” That is, until yesterday, when the Museum turned to Twitter for help deciphering the handwriting. Within a few hours, the mystery was solved. The book, which may have never been returned, was Israel by by Ludwig Lewisohn. A great example of the power of social media.

cool!